Pinch Pleats

Choosing a pinch pleat curtain heading

Want to upgrade from standard drawstring pencil pleat curtains to something a little more classy?

Elegant pinch pleats are the perfect way to showcase your chosen fabric. Folded pleats are permanently sewn along the curtain header, creating a stylishly uniform drape.

Pinch pleat curtains are wonderfully versatile. They can be made to hang on either tracks or rods, and there are a number of different pinch pleat styles to suit any interior. Below, we take a look at the different pinch pleat options.

 

Single Pinch Pleat

Also sometimes referred to as a ‘New York pleat’ or a ‘one finger pleat’.

Single one finger New York pinch pleat curtain header

Single folds are sewn into the header of the fabric at regular intervals, causing the fabric to drape in a simplistic and uniform style. This is the most economical choice in pencil pleats, since it requires the least amount of fabric and investment in making. This contemporary look is ideal for small window treatments, as it isn’t overpowering or too busy.

 

Inverted Pleat

Also sometimes referred to as a ‘box pleat’.

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An inverted pleat is exactly the same as a single pinch pleat, just reversed! The pleats are hidden at the back of the curtain, creating a gorgeous wall of fabric at the front. Since it’s just like the single pinch pleat, it’s also another economical option.

 

Double Pinch Pleat

Also sometimes referred to as a ‘Dutch pleat’ or a ‘two finger pleat’.

Double finger Dutch pinch pleat curtain header

Sets of two folds are sewn into the header of the fabric at regular intervals in a neat row of ‘V’s. This uses more fabric than a single pinch pleat, creating a fuller, more sumptuous curtain with plenty of body.


Triple Pinch Pleat

Also sometimes referred to as a ‘French pleat’ or a ‘three finger pleat’.

Triple three finger French pinch pleat curtain header

Trios of folds are sewn into the header of the fabric at regular intervals, creating a fan shape. This is very elegant and formal look and requires the most fabric to achieve, giving an incredibly luxurious full drape.

Given the volume of fabric used, triple French pleated curtains require a larger area to ‘stack back’ – the spot where the curtains sit when they’re open. It is recommended that you run your tracks well past the boundaries of the windowpane in order to be able to stack them back without obscuring the window.


Curtains shown in the examples above are all made with the Charles Parsons Interiors design Majestic Silk Drizzle, and were crafted by the talent at Lahood Window Furnishings. The chair is upholstered in Savoy Saxon Blue, and the cushion is made of Laurent Silver fabric.